Bracken Rigg , barn dance , barn , ceilidh band , ceilidh , accordion , accordion band , Scottish , Irish, Concertina, Anglo Concertina, Jeffries Bracken Rigg , barn dance , barn , ceilidh band , ceilidh , accordion , accordion band , Scottish , Irish, Concertina, Anglo Concertina, Jeffries
WELCOME TO
BRACKEN RIGG BARN DANCE BAND


JEFFRIES' ANGLO and WHEATSTONE ENGLISH CONCERTINA PAGE

Question. What is Bracken Rigg?

Brackenrigg on old map Answer. A Roman fort at the Western end of Hadrian's Wall?




WRONG, It is South Yorkshire's most popular traditional accordion
band, playing for Barn Dances and Ceilidhs for over 40 years.

Brackenrigg is the Roman Fort, but we are nearly as ancient.

MY CONCERTINAS

Nameplate closeup on Jeffries Anglo Concertina Nameplate closeup on Jeffries Anglo Concertina

Unlike English concertinas, Anglo concertinas are diatonic - two notes to a button (push and pull) and because they are push/pull, they give lift especially to Irish music and Morris Dancing. Inside, the reeds and their scales are not dissimilar to those in a mouth organ

This early 39 key Jeffries anglo concertina was found in an attic in pieces. The woodwork and reeds are all original but the bellows are brand new.
This concertinas more unusual features are the inset metal ends (found on many concertinas but very rarely on a Jeffries this early) and also the very thin buttons.
Although stamped Jeffries, "it is highly likely that the metal ends were made by Crabb" to quote Geoff Crabb, but things become a little vaguer when concertinas are a joint effort by more than one firm as explained below.

Jeffries concertinas are never numbered so if there are no dates inside (see my previous anglo concertina), the layout of the fretwork and the name stamp is sometimes the best (and sometimes only) guide to dates.
From around 1868, the earliest Jeffries concertinas (20 to 26 key wooden ended) were signed in ink on the inside "C. Jeffries, his own make", although current speculation is that similarities in construction suggest that Crabb made some or all of the parts for quite a number of them.
The layout of the levers and how they cross (especially the C drone and G#/Bb lever) is sometimes a guide to deciding on Crabb / Jeffries.
By the 1890s, Charles Jeffries was making the whole instrument which were stamped "C. Jeffries Maker".
After around 1900, Jeffries started putting an address on and the layout of these addresses stamps being the best guide to dates.
The name stamp does not have the excepted serifs for a Jeffries mark and the stamp looks to be made up of individual letter stamps which are not too neatly aligned so they best we can say is towards 1880.
Once this instrument is played though (or heard), it is very obvious the reeds were made by Jeffries.

The restoration work was beautifully carried out by Colin and Rosalie Dipper from Warminster and I couldn't believe my luck when this box came my way - I had to have it.

PHOTOGRAPHS ARE TO FOLLOW VERY SHORTLY

Jeffries Anglo Concertina Makers Stamp Jeffries Anglo Concertina Makers Stamp Left hand side of Jeffries Anglo Concertina As you can see, I take my concertina to bed. Right hand side of Jeffries Anglo Concertina

Bellows Detail on Jeffries Anglo Concertina

MY ANGLO CONCERTINA LAYOUT

My Key Layout (Word Document)

A BLANK 30 KEY CONCERTINA MAP (Print out and fill in)
Most useful for learning scales!

Blank Map (Word Document)

MY WHEATSTONE ENGLISH CONCERTINA

Right Hand - Wheatstone English Concertina Right Hand - Wheatstone English Concertina Right Hand - Wheatstone English Concertina
Label - Wheatstone English Concertina Left Hand - Wheatstone English Concertina Left Hand - Wheatstone English Concertina

CONCERTINA.NET - The best concertina site going! Everything you need to know! Concertina.net

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Page Last Updated: 27th July, 2017